Posted 3 months ago by -Deb Leggett

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, more than 13,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with cervical cancer each year, and more than 4,000 of women will die. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer for women worldwide, but because it develops over time, it is also one of the most preventable types of cancer. January has been set aside to bring awareness to this particular type of cancer and to educate women on the need for annual screenings. Cervical cancer tends to occur during midlife. It is most frequently diagnosed in women between the ages of 35 and 44. It rarely affects women under age 20, and more than 15 percent of diagnoses are made in women older than 65. But in women over 65, cancer typical occurs in women who were not receiving regular screening. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in about 99% of cervical cancers. There are over 100 different types of HPV, most of which are considered low-risk and do not cause cervical cancer. High-risk HPV types may cause cervical cell abnormalities or cancer. More than 70 percent of cervical cancer cases can be attributed to two types of the virus, HPV-16 and HPV-18, often referred to as high-risk HPV types. 

Symptoms of Cervical Cancer

Precancerous cervical cell changes and early cancers of the cervix generally do not cause symptoms. For this reason, regular screening through Pap and HPV tests can help catch precancerous cell changes early and prevent the development of cervical cancer.

Possible symptoms of more advanced disease may include abnormal or irregular vaginal bleeding, pain during sex, or vaginal discharge. Notify your healthcare provider if you experience:

  • Abnormal bleeding, such as
    • Bleeding between regular menstrual periods
    • Bleeding after sexual intercourse
    • Bleeding after douching
    • Bleeding after a pelvic exam
    • Bleeding after menopause
  • Pelvic pain not related to your menstrual cycle
  • Heavy or unusual discharge that may be watery, thick, and possibly have a foul odor
  • Increased urinary frequency
  • Pain during urination

These symptoms could also be signs of other health problems, not related to cervical cancer. If you experience any of the symptoms above, talk to a your healthcare provider.

At Primary Care Clinic, we offer womens health services such as Oral contraception, STD screening and routine pap and gynecological testing. 

For more information please contact

http://www.nccc-online.org/hpvcervical-cancer/cervical-cancer-overview/